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Saturday, February 28, 2009

Breach of the breachway

Charlestown Breachway. Oil on stretched canvas, 11x14
please contact me for price and shipping/delivery info

After spending some time in and around Westerly with my stepdaughter, her significant other and my youngest grandson, I headed to Charlestown Beach to paint. Saturday, the forecasters said, would be the last snowless day for a while.

It would not be the last windless day. I pulled into the Charlestown Breachway parking lot, on the DEM side, and set up my easel. I hung my heavy painting bag from my easel as ballast, left my paper palette in the trunk of the Miata and reminded myself that spring is only a spell away.

As I painted, I heard a truck revving. I turned to see some moron in a Silverado doing donuts in the parking lot, kicking up sand and rocks, spewing noise and fumes and generally just acting like the whole place belonged to him and he intended to wreck it.

I turned and gave him a series of dirty looks, but he kept doing it. Again and again, he'd rev the engine and gun the accelerator and spin the truck around.

So I called the cops. By the time they arrived, the idiot in the truck had parked on the town side of the lot, facing the dunes, and had gone onto the beach. I motioned the cop over and pointed out the stooge's truck. The cop pulled up, looked inside and then positioned his own car directly behind the truck so the guy couldn't get out.

By now, I was frozen to the bone and the wind was even stronger and colder. My painting was finished enough that I could bring it home and put the final touches on it here. Also, I wanted to get the heck out of there before that jerk in the truck decided to punch me.

I packed up and pulled out of the lot just as the DEM police were pulling in, lights and sirens going. Yeah!

It was a good day, in my book. I am all for letting people be people, and for the most part, if they want to break the law, that's their business as long as it doesn't involve me or anyone I love. But I draw the line at dolts destroying protected land that we all are invited to share.

Thanks for reading!

Thursday, February 26, 2009

First of a series, I hope

Church No. 1, Newent, Conn. Oil on deep-cradled gesso panel, 6x24
please contact me for price and shipping/delivery info

I began this painting in January, on a 10x20 stretched canvas. I painted it first with the canvas vertical. The church was about halfway down, and was fairly large.

While there were a couple really cool areas in that painting, the work as a whole was a failure. It stands in the basement, where I can see it from my easel.

I knew that there was something in the painting, though I hadn't captured it. For starters, it was the first in what I hope, and have planned, will be a series of paintings of churches. I love churches. I love the way they sit on the land, so proud and so solid. Their planes tend to pick up light and shadows in a way that is definite and assertive and intriguing.

So I looked at the failed painting every day, and slowly, I began to understand why I didn't like it. As I began to understand the problems of that painting, this new one began to present itself.

This one is a whole lot more expensive than my average painting, but it is well worth it. Yes, in time, the price might come down. But for now, this painting has a feeling, an emotional essence, a draw that is beyond the power of most of my efforts to date, at least, my New England efforts. This painting has the impact of my paintings of the West (http://jacobson-arts.com/Wisdom_trip_thumbnails.html).

As always, if you're really crazy about this painting, but you can't come up with the money right now, contact me (carriebjacobson@gmail.com) and we will work it out.

Thanks for reading!

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Reservoir Night


Reservoir Night. Oil on stretched canvas, 6x12

I woke this morning to find that Bank Street No. 2 had sold. It was my first sale of a painting from this blog, and it was purchased by an unemployed friend. Even though this friend is without a job, she has now bought two of my paintings - as many as anyone in the universe. I am remarkably touched by this.

Honestly, every time someone buys a painting of mine, I am moved. I create these things, I put my soul and my being into each of them, and then I send them out onto the blog, into the universe.

They're formed well, or they are formed slightly. Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't work so very well. The ones I feel are true failures, no one sees. The ones that succeed only because they have one idea, or one stroke, or one edge that I like, they live for a while, and then, generally, I paint over them.

My paintings are on the blog and on the jacobson-arts website, and on the Hygienic site (http://hygienic.ning.com/Profile/CarrieJacobson). They've been in galleries and in contests, in one museum and in Noah's restaurant. And they're in people's homes.

I like that these things I've created have ended up in a bedroom or hallway or dining room of a family's house, that this painting is now a part of a different life, another life. Children will grow up with it, friends will see it, it might be given away or handed down or sold, and some day, someone will wonder where that painting was painted, and why, and how it came to hang there. And with luck, someone will remember, and tell the story.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Bank Street, Take 2

Bank Street No. 2. Oil on stretched canvas, 11x14. Sold

My brother Rand had a pretty strong reaction to my first Bank Street painting. It was not the Bank Street he remembered, not the Bank Street he saw in his mind's eye. His was a darker Bank Street, I believe, more thick with shadows and, perhaps, despair, or danger or dissolution.

He sent me an email, asking interesting questions, difficult to answer, about voice and tone and the impulse to discover.

This came on one of the days that I worked on the children's art show in Mystic. A series of pieces I received were brought by a teacher from East Lyme who had asked her students to take a photo, transmute it into black and white, and then paint from that. It's a fascinating collection of truly amazing paintings, and for anyone around here, the show opens Saturday and runs through the end of March.

I've also been thinking about a painting by a local man, Robert Hauschild. It's a big piece, painted all in black and white Rustoleum, and including about a million tones between the two. It's a view of Bank Street, I think, and it looks like something from a dream about a film noir about New London.

I've also been thinking about the next step in my painting - well, more sensing that next step, glimpsing it, nearly feeling it - and it involves shadows and darkness and I don't know what else.

All of these impulses came together in Bank Street No. 2.

I'd love to hear any comments or ideas.

Thanks for reading!

Monday, February 23, 2009

Young eyes

Reservoir No. 2. Oil on cradled gessoboard panel, 6x12

I volunteered to help the Mystic Arts Center with its annual Young at Art show, for kids from o to 18. One piece per young artist, no fee, no jury.

Yesterday was the first of two receiving days; today is the second. Tuesday, we hang the show, which already involves nearly 200 pieces.

A whole lot of this art is just great. It's vibrant, free, and fun. A painting of a tiger haunts my memory this morning. A series of black and white paintings from a high school class has moved me to try the same. A piece by a child of 2, who had a blast with some blue paint and a brush, well, if it was for sale, I'd buy it.

The show opens Saturday, and is up for the month of March. If you're around Mystic and needing inspiration, check it out.

Here are some exhibit opportunities in the coming week:

DEADLINE: Monday, Feb. 23 (that's today)
I-Park Environmental Art Residency Program
Environmental artists, landscape/garden designers, visual/performance-based artists are invited to submit proposals for site-specific works on the grounds of I-Park artists' community in rural East Haddam, CT (U.S.). Twelve artists will be selected for two, two-week residency sessions (August 17 – 31, September 2 – 16, 2009). $1,200 grant plus up to $1,000 travel costs/materials reimbursement. Lodging/meals provided. A public event on September 19, 2009 will showcase the work. Refer to the I-Park website for details, application materials. Application Deadline: February 23.
Contact: Agnes T. Miyuki | (860) 873-2468 | http://www.i-park.org | ipark@ureach.com

Deadline: Feb. 28: Created to help emerging artists break into the Midwest art scene, emerge is distributed quarterly to over 100 galleries in the Midwest. Six artists are hand selected for each issue - full color spreads of work plus all contact information available to galleries and collectors. Open to all artists nationwide, working in any medium. $12 total for 3-10 images. Juror: Heath Yenna, accomplished artist and former Gallery Director. Deadline: February 28, 2009. $12 total for 3-10 images. Details online at http://www.emergeartzine.com or artists can send SASE to: PO Box 114, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. Questions? Contact Sarah Earle at emergeartzine@yahoo.com


Deadline: Feb. 28:
"Art Biologic" call for entries -- SlowArt Productions announces a call to artists for "Art Biologic". The exhibition will be held May 2-30, 2009 at the Limner Gallery in Hudson, NY. Juror: Limner Gallery Director. $2400 in publication awards. Open to all media. Limited to artwork inspired by nature and the biological world. Entry fee: $35. Deadline: February 28, 2009. The prospectus is available online at http://www.slowart.com/prospectus/biologic.htmslowart@aol.com or 518-828-2343.


Deadline: Feb. 28:
"Out of Nature (WSG)" call for entries (Posted: 1/23/09) -- Whistle Stop Galleryonline exhibition that begins March 30, 2009. Monetary and non-monetary awards are available, see website for details. Juror: Joseph A. Langley. The subject matter can be plant or animal. The intent is to inspire thoughts of Spring and Summer; nature returning from the brief respite of colder weather (or not so brief, in many cases). Feel free to represent your Spring and Summer seasons as they present themselves to you. No offensive, vulgar, or nude imagery is permitted. $5 USD per work, with a 5 work maximum. Entries must be postmarked by February 28, 2009. For prospectus, visit http://www.whistlestop-gallery.com/go/_ht/index.php?page=For%20Artists or send a SASE to: Whistle Stop Gallery, PO Box 967, Granite City, IL, 62040. Questions? Contact Joseph A. Langley at admin@whistlestop-gallery.com.


Deadline: Feb. 28:
"In Your Grocer's Freezer (WSG)" call for entries (Posted: 1/23/09) -- Whistle Stop Gallery announces a call to artists for "In Your Grocer's Freezer (WSG)", an online exhibitionFebruary 28, 2009. Prospectus available at http://www.whistlestop-gallery.com/go/_ht/index.php?page=For%20Artists or send a SASE to: Whistle Stop Gallery, PO Box 967, Granite City, IL, 62040. Questions? Contact Joseph A. Langley at admin@whistlestop-gallery.com.


Deadline: Feb. 29: "Art's Alive" (Posted: 1/29/09) -- The Town of Ocean City announces a call to artists for Art's Alive, held June 20 & 21, 2009 at Northside Park in Ocean City, Maryland. Total of $5,000.00 in cash and Ribbons. Media Categories: Ceramics, Drawing, Fiber, Furniture, Glass, Printmaking, Jewelry, Mixed Media, Painting, Photography, Sculpture, Fine Wood. The Art's Alive Jury determines artistic eligibility. The intention of the Art's Alive Fine Art Show is to encourage and support the creation of original art. All work must be original, created and executed by the applicant's own hand, and of professional quality. $25 entry fee /$200 space fee. Deadline: February 29, 2009. Visit http://www.ococean.com for more information, or send a SASE to: 200 125th Street & the Bay, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. Questions? Please contact Brenda Moore at bmoore@ococean.com or call 410-250-0125.

Sunday, February 22, 2009

Bank Street

Bank Street. Oil on cradled gessoboard panel. Sold

When I was a kid, Bank Street in New London was a happening place. The Capitol movie theater drew crowds. Marcus's had the best collection of Levi's anywhere. I can still remember the way that store smelled, rich with the scent of never-worn denim and corduroy. Solomon's, which used to be right near Marcus's, had any kind of stationary you could ever want.

If I was feeling brave, I'd go into Caruso's Music and look at the guitars and other instruments. But there were always very, very cool boys hanging around in there, and they all knew how uncool I was, and they would look at me, and this freaked me out. So when I wanted guitar strings or sheet music for the piano, I often just went to the little old guy, again, right near Marcus's. There was never anyone else in there, cool or otherwise.

Olympic Sporting Goods thrived on Bank Street. So did Timmy Conn's leather store. Now, I realize, it probably was a head shop. But Timmy Conn made the most exquisite sandals. Fitted them right to your feet. It took weeks for him to make them, and waiting was part of the thrill.

These days, it looks like Bank Street has a chance. The Capitol still sits empty, and Caruso's has moved around the corner. J. Solomon has a new place, on Bank but farther from State Street. Marcus is still open, and the next time I need a pair of jeans, I am going to buy them there. Timmy Conn's shop is long gone, and I wonder where he is and whether he's still making those beautiful sandals.

The Hygienic has become a savior of Bank Street, I think. So has Rick Waterhouse. Even Book-A-Zine, the adult book store, probably should get some credit. It's been there nearly as long as anyone.

Saturday, February 21, 2009

New England afternoon

Enders Island. Oil on stretched canvas, 6x12, $55

It's winter, and so no one is keeping people off the private roads of Mason's Island yet. Yesterday at sunset, I went exploring. I'd forgotten how beautiful it is on Mason's Island, and also on Enders Island, the retreat at Mason's Island very tip.

Today, I set out to find a painting there. I wanted to try at sunset, but I'm going to visit my sister this evening, so I went in the afternoon. I set up near the Mason's Island Yacht Club and began to paint. The sun was shining, the water was calm and only the seagulls were making noise.

Ten minutes later, everything changed. A gale blew in across the Sound. The surface of the water broke into choppy waves. The leaves of my paper palette went flying, smearing paint all over. My brushes blew off the trunk of the Miata. My scarf blew into my wet painting, my hair blew into my eyes, and I packed everything up and left.

I finished this little painting in the basement. It's not as pretty there as it is on Mason's Island, but it's a heck of a lot warmer.

Friday, February 20, 2009

Wishful thinking

Last Snow? Oil on stretched canvas, 11x14
please contact me for price and shipping/delivery info

It sure feels like this winter should be over, but it's not. The night turned cold, the rain turned to snow, and I woke to see everything covered in white again.

Still, there's a different quality to the light. And dawn comes much, much earlier these days. It seems to hasten in leaps and bounds, and that feels hopeful and heartening.

I was looking at the blog of R. Garriott ( http://rgarriott.blogspot.com/) a painter of gorgeous flowers, among other things... A painting on her site led me to the work of Taryn Day (http://awakeandpainting.blogspot.com/) and something that she wrote - it doesn't really matter what, and I can't remember anyways - made me look out the window and see, as if for the first time, the scene just beyond the pane.

It's nothing, really, just a tangle of trees and brambles, a stone wall and our neighbor's house in the distance. But the morning sun was slicing through the grove, and leaving streaks of shadow and light on the new-fallen snow - and I knew that this thing I've been looking for the past week was here. I ran down into the basement and grabbed my stuff and hauled it upstairs and painted in a frenzy -

And there is something in this painting. Something in the shadows, in the texture, in the play of light - the next step, it's here.

Thanks for reading!

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Small changes, big changes



Lantern Hill Lake Redux


I went back into this painting and made a series of changes that brought it closer to what I had imagined it could be. I admit, it might be hard to see the changes. I tried putting the two photographs side by side, but the differences in the photographs themselves (the light of today and yesterday, really) were so distracting that I decided against it.

The biggest difference to my eyes is in the ice. I deepened the colors there, painting vertically, and then went over them horizontally, using a palette knife, with a light blue-white. I also lightened the tip-top branches of the trees, and brightened the shoreline. I like the painting much better.

The best part of today was going to Dick Blick's in Plainfield (Plainville?) and buying 45 or so canvases. And why, might you ask, was I buying canvases in such bulk? Because I've got another painting trip in the works.

At the end of March, I'm setting out for Tubac, Arizona. That's where my dad and his wife live when they don't live in Norwich. I've never been to visit them, partly because of my desperate fear of flying, and partly because I never had the time, while I was working. So I will get to see where they live, and spend a little time with them, and paint in another brand-new place.

I can hardly wait!

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Scratching the surface

Lantern Hill Lake. Oil on stretched canvas, 12x16

In the cold of the boat-launch ramp at Lantern Hill Lake yesterday, I reached for the next rung in my painting ladder. It has something to do with shadows, I think, and something to do with some kind of lacy veil I need to pull over the sharpness of certain parts of my paintings.

As I was driving to the lake yesterday, I got a whiff of where I'm going with this, and in my mind's eye, I caught a glimpse of how these paintings will look. This one doesn't capture that feeling fully, or even mostly, though places in it bring me a certain sense of ease, and so I am hopeful.

I have climbed another technical mountain, and managed to add a "buy now" button to my blog. This means that if a painting strikes you, and you'd really like to have it, and make sure no one else gets it, you can buy it right there, using a credit card or pay pal.

So far, I have not sold a single painting directly from this blog. I have posted paintings that I've sold in real life, but none that I've offered for sale here has resonated strongly enough with you readers to prompt you to purchase. And if that's the case, that's fine. My painting is evolving, and part of that process involves me finding out what motivates and moves collectors and would-be collectors.

But if the issue has been that it's been difficult or awkward to figure out how to buy a painting, well, that problem is solved.

If you buy a painting from the blog, it will, in general, arrive unframed; I post them here on the day I paint them, or a day or two after. If you buy one, and you live in mailing distance, it will be a week or so until the painting is dry enough to send through the mail. If you buy a pastel, it will arrive framed.

I've put "buy now" buttons on paintings back through the middle of January. I will extend the buttons backwards as I have time. If you want a painting from earlier, just let me know and I will enable the transaction!

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Better than daytime TV

Pumpkin and Patch. Oil on stretched canvas. Sold.

Today, I returned to the Atria Senior Living center in Waterford, and, while a group of about 12 Atria residents watched, I made this painting of Suzanne Myler's dogs.

I'm pretty happy with Pumpkin, the dog at the top - but I'm not too pleased with Patch, at the bottom. In the photo from which I was working, Patch looked pretty stern. He clearly is the dominant dog, and in the photo, he looked grumpy, serious and distinctly alpha.

But Suzanne lives with him, and sees his sweet and goofy side, and I think that the reason I'm unhappy with Patch is that I changed him mid-painting to try to capture her vision of him.

When Suzanne commissioned me to do the painting, I told her that I'd keep at it until I got the dogs' personalities just right - and it was interesting for me and the Atri-ettes, I believe, to watch the process, and watch me struggle and work to change something I'd set down so deliberately.

One of the photos Suzanne had given me showed Patch as a puppy. In that photo, he is sweet and silly and playful. I'd shied away from using this photo because it was taken so long ago - before Pumpkin showed up, even. But it shows the side of Patch that Suzanne loves.

So tomorrow, I'm going to start over again with Patch, and paint his sunny side. I'll post the new painting here on the blog.

I've been in a little bit of a funk with my painting recently. I know this means I'm heading for a breakthrough, but right now, it just feels like my reach has extended far beyond my grasp. This afternoon, after I left the Atria center, I painted outdoors, and while my painting still didn't measure up to my ideas, it came closer.

It was fun and rewarding to paint while the seniors watched. They asked good questions, they were impressively accepting, and they seemed to enjoy the whole thing. I know I did.

Thanks for reading!

Monday, February 16, 2009

New skills

Flowers. Oil on masonite, 4x4
sold


I had real trouble photographing this still life - but I had fun painting it.

These five - count 'em, five! - pots of flowers were sitting on the kitchen table, waiting for me on Valentine's Day. There was a card, too, that played music. Woodreau, the little bichon, was scared to death of the card. But then, he's afraid of me when I'm wearing a hat.

I set the flowers up on the dining room table, and painted in the afternoon sun. I shot my first batch of photos last night, and finally gave up, to try again this morning. Looks like this is the best I'm going to get, in spite of all sorts of Photoshop work.

Painting a still life seems to use a different set of skills, at least in me. Everything from setting it up, to seeing it clearly, to painting it - you'd think these might just be indoor versions of the skills I've been developing outdoors, but apparently, they're not.

But then, writing a play takes a whole different set of skills than writing a news story does. Why would I think art was any different?

Saturday, February 14, 2009

A day at the beach

Fire District Beach. Oil on stretched canvas, 12x24

Thursday, Peter and I went to Weekapaug and then to the Fire District Beach, and the wind was blowing and the surf was churning way, way out, with a ferocity you usually see in big storms - but this was just a big blow, no clouds, no rain, just wind.

Friday, I went back, hoping to paint some surf. But the wind had changed. Now it was blowing out into the ocean. The waves and the surf had calmed, the sky was astonishingly clear, and the day brilliant and cold. I set up on a wooden walkway over the dunes, and I painted fast. I hung my paint bag from my easel as ballast, and held onto the canvas, which is one of those deep ones, too deep for the holder on the easel to grip. The bag kept blowing off, and I kept dropping my brushes. My palette was a sail in the wind.

But it was a good painting day, if a breathless one.

Thanks for reading!





Thursday, February 12, 2009

I'm melllting... I'm mellllting!

Reservoir. Oil on cradled gessoboard panel, 8x8. sold

The day dawned gray and warm, the snow still melting, but the ice in the yard hard and slippery. An hour after the sun came up, the wind came up, too, howling and screaming in from the ocean. It blew limbs down, buffeted my car around, tossed grit across parking lots and generally made it impossible to paint outside.

So I found refuge in my basement studio, and painted the melting reservoir I'd tried to capture the other day. I like the way the reflections shine in the water standing on the still-frozen ice. I like the way the ice slush floats on that water. And I like the light in the sky, and in the reflections on the reservoir.

I think the painting should perhaps be more complex than it is... I think it's not completely clear that the water on top of the ice is a puddle, not an open space. But I think it's going to take a live session to make that visible.

So if it's not blowing a hurricane tomorrow, and if the reservoir has neither frozen solid nor melted fully, I'll station myself at its edge and give it another go.

On an entirely different note, neither of the paintings I entered to be juried for the Connecticut Regional Artists Show was accepted. But both of Peter's photographs were!

For more, check out jacobson-arts.com, or http://hygienic.ning.com/profile/CarrieJacobson. And if you want to see a slideshow of Peter's work, see http://hygienic.ning.com/profile/PeterJacobson.






Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Happy spring!


First Breath of Spring. Oil on stretched canvas, 10x20. sold

I really like this painting. I stood in the warm sun on our back porch and painted the yard I'd painted so many times this winter. In those winter paintings, it was covered with snow, but today, the snow just melted away. You could almost see it going.

The sun shone through the bare limbs of the trees in the grove, and that sun was bright and warm and clear, nothing like winter's thin threads of light. Birds sang and swooped onto the feeder, and yesterday's squirrels must have been assaulting someone else's store of seeds.

I like the vertical feel of the painting, and the way the light splashes on the greening ground. I like the edge of snow and the shadows that lengthen on it. I like the blue sky and the way the sun plays on the trees just visible in the background.

I lunched today with a friend from high school; I haven't seen her in decades. We reunited by accident outside the Lighthouse Gallery in Groton, and it was an absolute pleasure to talk with her today and share the paths our lives have taken. I continue to feel that I'm on the lip of something big and good and positive, and all these experiences are part of it.

Thanks for reading!




Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Squirrels... and calls for entry

Watch Hill Pier. Oil on stretched canvas, 8x24
sold







The day got away from me a little, mostly because of squirrels.

I was set to head out to Westerly, to see Erika and whatever grandchildren were around, and then to paint, and then to head back to Groton to swim, when Peter called to me to look out the window.

Our "squirrel-proof" bird feeders hang on a maple just 10 feet from the house. One of the feeders is a clear plastic cylinder with a metal cage around it, and a small plate just beneath it. The seeds spill onto the plate, and the birds alight and eat from the plate.

When we got the feeder, it took the squirrels about six minutes to figure out that they could clamp their back feet onto the cage and hang upside down and grab seeds from the tray. They do this, and it's OK. There are plenty of seeds to go around.

But this morning, when Peter called me, I could barely believe my eyes. A squirrel had gotten the top off the feeder and was hanging upside down INSIDE the tube, stuffing seeds into his mouth with both hands. He did have to pull himself out of the tube and get upright to swallow. Otherwise, I have no doubt that that squirrel's gut would have grown enough during the day to wedge him into the tube.

I watched and laughed as the squirrel persisted. Birds lighted on the tray and ate, and another squirrel hung upside down on the outside of the cylinder and ate while his buddy hung inside, and before I knew it, time had passed.

So when I'd done my errands and made my visit, I was late setting up to paint. And once I started, I couldn't stop. The sky shone a pearly gray, and the ice on the bay softened as I painted. The reflections on the open water warmed in color and hue as I painted, and I ended up blowing off my swimming date and finishing the painting.

Here are a few opportunities coming up this week:

Deadline: Friday
Academy of Fine Arts Annual National Juried Art Competition
-- The Academy of Fine Arts in Lynchburg, Virginia announces a call to artists for its Annual National Juried Art Competition, held April 3-24, 2009. Cash Awards up to $2000. Juror: Sally Lamb Bowring. Open to U.S. residents, 18 years or older, working in the following disciplines: painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, fiber, glass, metal and mixed media. No photography accepted. All work submitted must be original (no reproductions), not done under supervision, not made from kits or patterns. All work must be suitably prepared for installation. Entries must have been completed after January 1, 2007, and not previously exhibited in a Lynchburg juried art show. $30 entry fee. Deadline: February 13, 2009. For prospectus, visit http://www.academyfinearts.com/gallery or send a SASE to: Academy of Fine Arts, 600 Main Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504. Questions? Please contact Ted Batt at tbatt@academyfinearts.com or call 434-528-3256.


Deadline: Friday
"Equality Virginia 20th Anniversary Art Show and Benefit"
-- Equality Virginia is accepting original works in all mediums for its 20th Anniversary Art Show and Benefit, March 13 - April 2, 2009 at the GCCR Gallery in Richmond, Virginia. Pieces should have a minimum value of $250 and be easily transportable. Submissions should be made to artshow@equalityvirginia.org in JPEG format by February 13, 2009. The pieces selected for the show will be included in the silent auction at the Commonwealth Dinner April 4, 2009. 75% of auction sale benefits Equality Virginia. $1250 in cash awards. Juror: Norman Goodwin. Visit http://www.equalityvirginia.org/artshow for more information. Questions? Please contact James Parrish at artshow@equalityvirginia.org

Deadline: Friday
Utah Ties - Juried Art Exhibition
(Posted: 1/26/09) -- The Central Utah Art Center (CUAC) in Ephraim, Utah announces a call to artists for "Utah Ties", a juried art exhibition held March 13 - April 8. Awards: $400/$200/$100. Juror: Moti Hasson. All Utah residents as well as artists with ties to Utah are invited to submit applications. $20 entry fee. Deadline: February 13, 2009. Download prospectus (PDF format) or send a SASE to: Utah Ties - Central Utah Art Center - 86 N Main St. Ephraim, UT 84627. Questions? Contact Jared Latimer at art@cuartcenter.org or 435-283-5110.

Deadline: Saturday, Feb. 14:
"4th Annual National Juried Competition and Exhibition" call for entries
(Posted: 11/6/08) -- The Katharine Butler Gallery announces a call to artists for the "4th Annual National Juried Competition and Exhibition", held April 15 - May 9, 2009 in Sarasota, Florida. Open to artists 18 years or older living in the United States. Original 2D and 3D artwork in any traditional medium, including fiber, ceramics, metal, and glass, except video. Work must have been completed within the last three years. Each artist may submit up to three entries, not to exceed 42" in any dimension, including frame. No giclee copies of any kind. 1st Place-$300 and 2nd Place-$200. Juror: Elaine Roy Slade. Deadline: February 14, 2009. Entry Fee: $25. Download Prospectus (PDF format) or send a SASE to: Katharine Butler Gallery, 1943 Morrill St., Sarasota, FL 34236. Questions? Please contact Chris Falk at falkc@kbutlergallery.com or call 941-955-4546.


Deadline: Saturday, Feb. 14:
"The 24th Tallahassee International" call for entries (Posted: 11/25/08) -- FSU Museum of Fine Arts announces a call to artists for "The 24th Tallahassee International", held August 24-September 27, 2009 in Tallahassee, Florida. Awards: 1st-$1000; 2nd-$500; color catalog. Juried by a panel of FSU College of Visual Arts, Theatre & Dance Faculty. Open to artists 18+ with all media eligible for consideration. $20.00 for 2 works. Deadline: February 14, 2009. For more information, visit http://www.mofa.fsu.edu/pages/participate/tallahasseeinternational.shtml or send a SASE to: Tallahassee International, 250 Fine Arts Bldg, PO Box 3061140, Tallahassee FL 32306-1140. Questions? Please contact Jean D. Young at jdyoung@fsu.edu or call 850-644-3906.

Deadline: Sunday
Dune Shack Residencies for Visual Artists, Writers & The Public
The Provincetown Community Compact, Inc. is pleased to announce the 2009 residency program for C-Scape & Fowler Dune Shacks. This novel program, which is a collaboration with the Cape Cod National Seashore, offers one and three week residencies for artists and the general public beginning in April 2009. A $500 fellowship and a three-week summer residency will be offered to one visual artist, and two one-week residencies for writers. No fee. Contact: www.thecompact.org Application deadline is February 15, 2009.

The Compact, a private non-profit tax exempt organization, was founded in 1993 by Jay Critchley to support the arts, environment and well being of Provincetown. It sponsors the annual Provincetown Swim for Life + Paddler Flotilla, set for September 12, 2009, and offers fiscal sponsorship for artist projects and grassroots community efforts. The Compact, P.O. Box 819. Provincetown, MA 02657 thecompact@comcast.net.
Contact: The Compact | | | thecompact@comcast.net

Deadline: Sunday
New Courtland Fellowship
The Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA), in partnership with NewCourtland is pleased to offer Philadelphia area artists the opportunity to participate in an exciting, new, community-based fellowship. Through the NewCourtland Artist Fellowship, eight artists will be selected to bring innovative and engaging art-making to residents of the vast NewCourtland network (http://www.newcourtland.org). In order to apply, artists are asked to develop an intergenerational project that brings NewCourtland’s residents together with school age children/teens to create a meaningful experience and an exciting artistic project. Work created by residents and their school age partners during the 2009 Fellowship Program will be exhibited with the work of the artist fellows in a large, well publicized exhibition.

Accepted artists will receive a fellowship award of $2,500 (to be paid in two $1,250 installments). Once artists receive this award they will be responsible for conducting ten 1.5 hour workshops weekly for NewCourtland residents (10-15 residents) and their student partners (10-15 students). Artists will also be required to attend several preliminary meetings, one aging sensitivity training session and participate in the spring 2010 exhibition. http://www.cfeva.org/publications.aspx

For more details and an application please contact Genevieve Coutroubis at 215 546-7775 x11 or Genevieve@cfeva.org. Applications can be downloaded at http://www.cfeva.org/Publications/NewCourtlandApplication2009.pdf
Contact: Genevieve Coutroubis | 215 546-7775 x11 | www.cfeva.org/Publications/NewCourtlandApplication | Genevieve@cfeva.org

Deadline: Sunday
Salida Riverside Fine Arts Festival" call for entries
(Posted: 12/20/08) -- Salida Riverside Fine Arts Festival is open to all artists residing in the United States. All work must be the original work of the accepted artist. Media categories: Ceramic, Drawing, Fiber, Glass, Jewelry, Leather, Metal, Mixed Media , Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, Wood. Visit www.salidaartfestival.com for details. Application is online at www.zapplication.org. Jury fee of $30. The festival will be held August 15 and 16, 2009 at Riverside Park, on the banks of the Arkansas River in Salida, Colorado. Deadline: February 15, 2009. Questions? Please contact Danna Tullis, Festival Director at mudlark@chaffee.net or (719)221-1566.

Thanks for reading!

Monday, February 9, 2009

A fine day

Afternoon Shadows. Oil on stretched canvas, 10x20
Contact me for price and shipping/delivery information

That's right: This painting sold before I got it off the easel. Down the road from our house, on Route 214, is this field, beside a pretty blue farmhouse that's clearly empty, and has gone downhill even in the year we've lived here.

But I painted this one at the end of the day. In the morning, I visited Atria Senior Housing and talked to a dozen or so residents about my trip to Wisdom, Montana. I brought paintings, and used them to illustrate my adventures. Sort of like a slideshow, except with paintings. (If you want to see those paintings, go to jacobson-arts.com). The women were a wonderful audience, attentive and easy. They asked good, smart question... and they liked my paintings. I'm going to go back soon and make a painting while they watch.

Then I had some errands, and I wanted to swim, so I painted close to home. The woman who bought this piece used to live in the house with her husband, who grew up there. It was a dairy farm originally, with hundreds of acres. Bad luck and some bad decisions led to the family's losing the house. The woman burst into tears when she told me her story. The painting will be her Father's Day present to her husband.

So this was a good day. A successful day. Good painting, good experiences, and the sun shining bright and warm.

Sunday, February 8, 2009

Quiet night

Quiet Night. Oil on stretched canvas, 14x16



This is the first portrait I've tried that's come out somewhere close to OK. It's a scene I know well - my husband reading, with a dog sleeping by his side. Our big red chair, the floor that needs a rug, the ottoman with books and papers piled on it.

Actually, there are more books and papers than I've painted here, but I will save those details for another painting. My purpose in this one was to get the mood, and to paint a human who looked like he was alive, and who resembles my husband. I'm pretty happy on both counts.


Saturday, February 7, 2009

Long post on a short pier

Watch Hill Pier, oil on canvas, 10x20





I've finished this painting, the first one I made last Sunday in Watch Hill, and it has opened my eyes a little.

I rarely go back and rework a plein-air painting. It is what it is, and that immediacy, that naked effort with all its surprises, stands at the heart of my art. It's what I like about my plein-air work. My paintings are not perfect, but they're imbued with a sort of energy that gives them life, and lets them speak for themselves.

But this one bugged me. It just didn't work.

I am very interested in paintings that have almost nothing in them and still work as paintings. I think the spareness gives the viewer room to supply his own story. And I find these spare paintings peaceful and soothing. Also, I'm not a fan of detail, nor am I good at it.

This scene seemed made to order. It is incredibly spare. There's the dock and the water, but that's about it. I'm not describing this well. The sky and the ice, the far-off bank and the unfrozen river in the background, are large swaths of seemingly unbroken color - and so, for this painting to work, the open water and the dock have to carry a heavy load.

And at first, they didn't. Nothing in this painting carried anything of note, except the sky. It's very subtle, and hard to see on the computer, but fine, thin clouds move in this sky, and I got them the first time and didn't touch the sky again.

But the rest! Faithful readers know I made a second painting that Sunday afternoon, and then reworked that painting. I started a third, too, an entirely studio-made painting that I am going to scrape away. But I went back to this first painting, and I redid it and redid it, and I think, this time, I got it.

There's actually a lot of color and movement in the ice, and the sky and on the far bank. I made the point of land more vague than it was at first, and more of a silhouette. And something wonderful happened with the dock surface and the shadows on it.

I can do valuable landscape work in the studio - and so that's a good lesson learned.

Thanks for reading!

Thursday, February 5, 2009

The view from heaven

Heaven. Oil on canvas paper

Some horrible illness knocked me flat for most of last week. At one point, whatever it was nestled in my muscles and set them to aching, and all I could think of was the hot tub at the Marriott.

I go to the Marriott four or five days a week, and exercise on the machines or swim in the pool. Then, I soak in the hot tub. That's my payoff for exercising, and believe me, it's a good payoff.

So when I was strong enough to get to my basement studio, I made this painting of the hot tub. I really like the reflections in the water and on the ceiling. I like the yellow walls you can see through the window, too. Regular readers of this blog will recall the painting I made of the Marriott patio (see "Distractions," my Jan. 16 blog entry, if you're interested). For a time, I had these two side by each on the bookcase. It was fun to see them like that.

I'm getting ready for the upcoming show at the Lighthouse Gallery in Groton, and for the jurying portion of the Connecticut Regional Artists Show at the Slater Museum. It's a tough show to get into, but I made it last year and believe I will make it this year. If any of you have suggestions about which pieces to enter (I get two), I'd be delighted to hear your thoughts.

Thanks for reading!

Wednesday, February 4, 2009

Pier and re-a-pier... or Pier Repair

Watch Hill Pier, oil on stretched canvas, 4x8
please contact me for price and shipping/delivery info





I made the first version of this small painting on Sunday, after painting a larger one that included more of the frozen bay. There was something amiss in the larger one, but I couldn't suss out what it was.

I got closer with the smaller one, but still, something was wrong. So yesterday, as the snow swirled and blew and covered everything again, I went down to the basement and began to paint. Working from my Sunday paintings, I did a third one. It was better, but still, I was missing the mark.

It wasn't until I was about to put these all aside and start on something else that I realized that the perspective on the pilings was just as wrong as it could be.

Sure, that didn't fix the myriad other problems I'd noticed. Repainting the pilings didn't teach me how to get the reflections to dance, or teach me how to make the water both flat and choppy - but I believe those skills will come.

For my eyes, repainting the pilings fixed the painting as a piece. Now, the lines draw me in, and bring me to those curves of open water. Now, I want to look down at the reflections. Now, I want to follow the edge of the ice and think about what's happening.

Thanks for reading!

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Big chill, small thaw


Watch Hill Dock. Oil on stretched canvas, 4x8

At our house, Sunday felt like summer. It was 30 degrees at 7 a.m. when I took the dogs out, and I wondered whether I should start looking for some shorts. By mid-afternoon, it was in the 40s, and I started thinking about putting the top down on the Miata when I went out to paint. Theories of relativity, eh?

In Watch Hill, Sunday was not quite so summery. All the stores were closed, and the streets deserted. The bay was frozen, and the wind that swept over it picked up its chill. But around the pilings on the docks, aerators bubbled, keeping the water open.

I was captivated by the way the water opened in s-curves around the dock footings, and I made two paintings before I was too cold to go on. I haven't captured that open water precisely to my liking, but I'm going to go down to my basement studio today and take another stab at it. I do like the way the reflections of the pilings look in this painting.

Chris Rose, who runs the Lighthouse Gallery in Groton, sent me the postcard for the March show he's mounting, of my work and the paintings of Laura Maiolo. He's got a great idea for the show, I think - "Places You Know - small pieces" by Laura and me. I'm pretty excited about it, and plan to spend this short month painting small, lovely landscapes. As my mother would have said, jingle your bells for me, would you, please?

Sunday, February 1, 2009

Calls for entry

Mule Cabins, Wisdom, Montana. Oil on stretched canvas, 16x20. Sold

I did most of this painting in plein air, in Wisdom, Montana, on one of the most beautiful and exhilarating days of my painting life. Just recently, I made some minor changes in it, signed it and sent it to live with Greg and Stephanie Bahr of Anaconda, Montana. They were out for a ride on their motorcycles on this beautiful June evening, and they pulled into the parking lot where I was painting, struck up a conversation with me and simply fell in love with this piece.

The following is something I'm committing to do on a regular basis. Every week or so, I will cull my list of calls and post the ones I find most interesting. If you're a painter and you follow my blog, let me know of calls that interest you, and I will add them.

I'm making no statements about these calls. I'm not endorsing them, or saying that they're right or good or trustworthy. I'm simply copying them from a variety of spots on the Internet and transferring them to my blog. Some of them, frankly, I just could not resist.

I hope you find the list useful!


Deadline: Friday, Feb. 6:
"Interpretation of the Truffle"
-- This juried exhibition held March 5-8, 2009, at the Grande Bohemian Resort in Asheville, NC is open to artists nationwide. Registration is free. Artwork should be inspired by the Truffle and should incorporate its likeness. Judges will review each piece based on the three Cs -- Creativity (overall idea behind the piece), Conceptual execution (how well the piece translates the idea) and Construction (the quality of production/final presentation). Those with the highest marks will be featured in the 2009 National Truffle Fest Art Exhibition and will receive national recognition and exposure. Awards: 1st, 2nd, 3rd - up to $1000 + vacation. Juror: Betty Garland and committee. Postmark Deadline: February 6, 2009. For more information, visit http://www.NationalTruffleFest.com/art.html or send a SASE to: 3020 Ode Turner Road - Hillsborough, NC 27278. Questions? Contact Betty V Garland at Betty@GarlandTruffles.com or 919-593-6214.

Submissions: Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 6 and 7:
Connecticut Artists Juried Exhibition
The Salter Memorial Museum has issued its call for entries for the 66th Annual Connecticut Artists Juried Exhibition to be displayed in the Slater Museum’s Converse Art Gallery from February 22 through April 2, 2009. Artists who are not on the mailing list may download a prospectus at www.slatermuseum.org, or call (860) 425-5563 to request a printed copy.

Selection is from actual work. Submissions for the show will be accepted 1 PM to 4 PM Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 7 and 8. Artists will be notified by mail following the jurying of submitted works. Entries not accepted may be picked up from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM Friday, Feb. 13, or 1 PM to 3:30 PM, Saturday, Feb. 14 and Sunday, Feb. 15.

This year’s juror of selection and awards is Ron Crusan.

Deadline: Friday, Feb. 13:
Academy of Fine Arts Annual National Juried Art Competition -- The Academy of Fine Arts in Lynchburg, Virginia announces a call to artists for its Annual National Juried Art Competition, held April 3-24, 2009. Cash Awards up to $2000. Juror: Sally Lamb Bowring. Open to U.S. residents, 18 years or older, working in the following disciplines: painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, fiber, glass, metal and mixed media. No photography accepted. All work submitted must be original (no reproductions), not done under supervision, not made from kits or patterns. All work must be suitably prepared for installation. Entries must have been completed after January 1, 2007, and not previously exhibited in a Lynchburg juried art show. $30 entry fee. Deadline: February 13, 2009. For prospectus, visit http://www.academyfinearts.com/gallery or send a SASE to: Academy of Fine Arts, 600 Main Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504. Questions? Please contact Ted Batt at tbatt@academyfinearts.com or call 434-528-3256.

DEADLINE: Sunday, Feb. 15:
Dune Shack Residencies for Visual Artists, Writers & The Public
The Provincetown Community Compact, Inc. is pleased to announce the 2009 residency program for C-Scape & Fowler Dune Shacks. This novel program, which is a collaboration with the Cape Cod National Seashore, offers one and three week residencies for artists and the general public beginning in April 2009. A $500 fellowship and a three-week summer residency will be offered to one visual artist, and two one-week residencies for writers. No fee. Contact: www.thecompact.org Application deadline is February 15, 2009.

The Compact, a private non-profit tax exempt organization, was founded in 1993 by Jay Critchley to support the arts, environment and well being of Provincetown. It sponsors the annual Provincetown Swim for Life + Paddler Flotilla, set for September 12, 2009, and offers fiscal sponsorship for artist projects and grassroots community efforts. The Compact, P.O. Box 819. Provincetown, MA 02657 thecompact@comcast.net.
Contact: The Compact | | | thecompact@comcast.net

DEADLINE: Monday, Feb. 23
I-Park Environmental Art Residency Program
Environmental artists, landscape/garden designers, visual/performance-based artists are invited to submit proposals for site-specific works on the grounds of I-Park artists' community in rural East Haddam, CT (U.S.). Twelve artists will be selected for two, two-week residency sessions (August 17 – 31, September 2 – 16, 2009). $1,200 grant plus up to $1,000 travel costs/materials reimbursement. Lodging/meals provided. A public event on September 19, 2009 will showcase the work. Refer to the I-Park website for details, application materials. Application Deadline: February 23, 2009
Contact: Agnes T. Miyuki | (860) 873-2468 | http://www.i-park.org | ipark@ureach.com


Deadline (postmark): Monday, Feb. 9: "Small Works 31st Harper College National Art Exhibition" call for entries (Posted: 1/27/09) -- Call to artists for the "Small Works 31st Harper College National Art Exhibition", held March 30 - April 28, 2009 in Palatine, Illinois. Juror: Debora Wood, Senior Curator, Mary and Leigh Block Museum, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Open to all artists over 18, living in the USA. Artwork must be no larger than 22" in largest dimension (including frame for 2D work). All media except jewelry, film and video. Digital images only. $25 for up to 3 entries. Deadline: February 9, 2009 (postmark). Download prospectus from website: http://www.harpercollege.edu (search on Small Works). Questions? Send email to smallworks@harpercollege.edu.

Deadline: Wednesday, Feb. 11:
3rd Ward 2009 Spring Solo Show: Open Call for Art

3rd Ward in Brooklyn, NY, announces a call to artists for its 2009 Spring Solo Show. $1,000 cash grant, 1-month residency at 3rd Ward with FULL facility access, and a solo exhibition in 3rd Ward's gallery. Jurors: Janet Ozzard, Editor at New York Magazine, Liz Dimmitt, Curator at Gawker Artists and Jarrett Gregory, Curator at the New Museum. Open to artists 18 or older. $25 entry fee. Deadline: February 11, 2009. Visit http://www.3rdward.com/springsoloshow for more information. Questions? Please contact Nikki Bagli at solo_show@3rdward.com or call 718-715-4961.

Deadline: Friday, Feb. 13:
"Equality Virginia 20th Anniversary Art Show and Benefit"
-- Equality Virginia is accepting original works in all mediums for its 20th Anniversary Art Show and Benefit, March 13 - April 2, 2009 at the GCCR Gallery in Richmond, Virginia. Pieces should have a minimum value of $250 and be easily transportable. Submissions should be made to artshow@equalityvirginia.org in JPEG format by February 13, 2009. The pieces selected for the show will be included in the silent auction at the Commonwealth Dinner April 4, 2009. 75% of auction sale benefits Equality Virginia. $1250 in cash awards. Juror: Norman Goodwin. Visit http://www.equalityvirginia.org/artshow for more information. Questions? Please contact James Parrish at artshow@equalityvirginia.org

Deadline: Friday, Feb. 13:
Utah Ties - Juried Art Exhibition
(Posted: 1/26/09) -- The Central Utah Art Center (CUAC) in Ephraim, Utah announces a call to artists for "Utah Ties", a juried art exhibition held March 13 - April 8. Awards: $400/$200/$100. Juror: Moti Hasson. All Utah residents as well as artists with ties to Utah are invited to submit applications. $20 entry fee. Deadline: February 13, 2009. Download prospectus (PDF format) or send a SASE to: Utah Ties - Central Utah Art Center - 86 N Main St. Ephraim, UT 84627. Questions? Contact Jared Latimer at art@cuartcenter.org or 435-283-5110.

Deadline: Saturday, Feb. 14:
"4th Annual National Juried Competition and Exhibition" call for entries
(Posted: 11/6/08) -- The Katharine Butler Gallery announces a call to artists for the "4th Annual National Juried Competition and Exhibition", held April 15 - May 9, 2009 in Sarasota, Florida. Open to artists 18 years or older living in the United States. Original 2D and 3D artwork in any traditional medium, including fiber, ceramics, metal, and glass, except video. Work must have been completed within the last three years. Each artist may submit up to three entries, not to exceed 42" in any dimension, including frame. No giclee copies of any kind. 1st Place-$300 and 2nd Place-$200. Juror: Elaine Roy Slade. Deadline: February 14, 2009. Entry Fee: $25. Download Prospectus (PDF format) or send a SASE to: Katharine Butler Gallery, 1943 Morrill St., Sarasota, FL 34236. Questions? Please contact Chris Falk at falkc@kbutlergallery.com or call 941-955-4546.


Deadline: Saturday, Feb. 14:
"The 24th Tallahassee International" call for entries (Posted: 11/25/08) -- FSU Museum of Fine Arts announces a call to artists for "The 24th Tallahassee International", held August 24-September 27, 2009 in Tallahassee, Florida. Awards: 1st-$1000; 2nd-$500; color catalog. Juried by a panel of FSU College of Visual Arts, Theatre & Dance Faculty. Open to artists 18+ with all media eligible for consideration. $20.00 for 2 works. Deadline: February 14, 2009. For more information, visit http://www.mofa.fsu.edu/pages/participate/tallahasseeinternational.shtml or send a SASE to: Tallahassee International, 250 Fine Arts Bldg, PO Box 3061140, Tallahassee FL 32306-1140. Questions? Please contact Jean D. Young at jdyoung@fsu.edu or call 850-644-3906.

Deadline: Sunday, Feb. 15
New Courtland Fellowship
The Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA), in partnership with NewCourtland is pleased to offer Philadelphia area artists the opportunity to participate in an exciting, new, community-based fellowship. Through the NewCourtland Artist Fellowship, eight artists will be selected to bring innovative and engaging art-making to residents of the vast NewCourtland network (http://www.newcourtland.org). In order to apply, artists are asked to develop an intergenerational project that brings NewCourtland’s residents together with school age children/teens to create a meaningful experience and an exciting artistic project. Work created by residents and their school age partners during the 2009 Fellowship Program will be exhibited with the work of the artist fellows in a large, well publicized exhibition.

Accepted artists will receive a fellowship award of $2,500 (to be paid in two $1,250 installments). Once artists receive this award they will be responsible for conducting ten 1.5 hour workshops weekly for NewCourtland residents (10-15 residents) and their student partners (10-15 students). Artists will also be required to attend several preliminary meetings, one aging sensitivity training session and participate in the spring 2010 exhibition. http://www.cfeva.org/publications.aspx

For more details and an application please contact Genevieve Coutroubis at 215 546-7775 x11 or Genevieve@cfeva.org. Applications can be downloaded at http://www.cfeva.org/Publications/NewCourtlandApplication2009.pdf
Contact: Genevieve Coutroubis | 215 546-7775 x11 | www.cfeva.org/Publications/NewCourtlandApplication | Genevieve@cfeva.org

Deadline: Sunday, Feb. 15:
Salida Riverside Fine Arts Festival" call for entries
(Posted: 12/20/08) -- Salida Riverside Fine Arts Festival is open to all artists residing in the United States. All work must be the original work of the accepted artist. Media categories: Ceramic, Drawing, Fiber, Glass, Jewelry, Leather, Metal, Mixed Media , Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, Wood. Visit www.salidaartfestival.com for details. Application is online at www.zapplication.org. Jury fee of $30. The festival will be held August 15 and 16, 2009 at Riverside Park, on the banks of the Arkansas River in Salida, Colorado. Deadline: February 15, 2009. Questions? Please contact Danna Tullis, Festival Director at mudlark@chaffee.net or (719)221-1566.

Deadline: Feb. 21:
A national juried visual art competition and exhibition, open to all two-dimensional visual artists, over the age of eighteen and currently residing in the United States. Any original, two-dimensional works of art including paintings, drawings, prints, photography, mixed media, and works using traditional and non-traditional materials are considered for the selection process. A full color brochure will be developed to document the exhibition. Awards totaling $5,000. Jeffrey Grove, The Wieland Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at The High Museum of Art located in Atlanta, Georgia will serve as this year's juror. The Halpert Biennial is a part of An Appalachian Summer Festival-a multi-arts festival featuring music, dance, theatre and visual arts. For a prospectus send SASE to: Halpert Biennial '09, Brook Bower, Box 32139, 423 West King St, Boone NC 28608 OR 828-262-7520 OR http://www.tcva.org


Deadline: Feb. 28: Created to help emerging artists break into the Midwest art scene, emerge is distributed quarterly to over 100 galleries in the Midwest. Six artists are hand selected for each issue - full color spreads of work plus all contact information available to galleries and collectors. Open to all artists nationwide, working in any medium. $12 total for 3-10 images. Juror: Heath Yenna, accomplished artist and former Gallery Director. Deadline: February 28, 2009. $12 total for 3-10 images. Details online at http://www.emergeartzine.com or artists can send SASE to: PO Box 114, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. Questions? Contact Sarah Earle at emergeartzine@yahoo.com


Deadline: Feb. 28:
"Art Biologic" call for entries (Posted: 12/31/08) -- SlowArt Productions announces a call to artists for "Art Biologic". The exhibition will be held May 2-30, 2009 at the Limner Gallery in Hudson, NY. Juror: Limner Gallery Director. $2400 in publication awards. Open to all media. Limited to artwork inspired by nature and the biological world. Entry fee: $35. Deadline: February 28, 2009. The prospectus is available online at http://www.slowart.com/prospectus/biologic.htm or artists can send SASE to: SlowArt Productions, 123 Warren Street, Hudson, NY 12534. Questions? Contact Tim Slowinski at slowart@aol.com or 518-828-2343.


Deadline: Feb. 28:
A Singular Creation 3rd Annual Art and Photography Competition (Posted: 1/22/09) -- Deadline: Saturday, February 28. A Singular Creation (ASC) is proud to present our 3rd Annual Art Competition. The competition is open to all artists worldwide, working in any media, excluding video. We will award large cash prizes and publication awards - as well as promote all artists heavily on our site. All artists' portfolios will remain on our site permanently. The competition will be juried by ASC founder, along with a small panel of ASC judges. Prospectus: http://www.asingularcreation.com/art-
competition.htm



Deadline: Feb. 28:
"Out of Nature (WSG)" call for entries (Posted: 1/23/09) -- Whistle Stop Gallery announces a call to artists for "Out of Nature (WSG)", an online exhibition that begins March 30, 2009. Monetary and non-monetary awards are available, see website for details. Juror: Joseph A. Langley. The subject matter can be plant or animal. The intent is to inspire thoughts of Spring and Summer; nature returning from the brief respite of colder weather (or not so brief, in many cases). Feel free to represent your Spring and Summer seasons as they present themselves to you. No offensive, vulgar, or nude imagery is permitted. $5 USD per work, with a 5 work maximum. Entries must be postmarked by February 28, 2009. For prospectus, visit http://www.whistlestop-gallery.com/go/_ht/index.php?page=For%20Artists or send a SASE to: Whistle Stop Gallery, PO Box 967, Granite City, IL, 62040. Questions? Contact Joseph A. Langley at admin@whistlestop-gallery.com.


Deadline: Feb. 28:
"In Your Grocer's Freezer (WSG)" call for entries (Posted: 1/23/09) -- Whistle Stop Gallery announces a call to artists for "In Your Grocer's Freezer (WSG)", an online exhibition that begins March 30, 2009. Monetary and non-monetary awards are available, see website for details. Juror: Joseph A. Langley. Have you ever pondered the artistic merit of a carrot? Use your inner artist to portray items found "in your grocer's freezer" and other grocery items. Try packaging design, meals made with grocery items, and even the items themselves. How do you abstract an onion? Maybe you could demonstrate! Let your imagination and creativity flow; just don't knock over the fruit juice on the bottom shelf. No offensive, vulgar, or nude imagery is permitted. Entries must conform to subject. $5 USD per work, with a 3 work maximum. Postmark deadline February 28, 2009. Prospectus available at http://www.whistlestop-gallery.com/go/_ht/index.php?page=For%20Artists or send a SASE to: Whistle Stop Gallery, PO Box 967, Granite City, IL, 62040. Questions? Contact Joseph A. Langley at admin@whistlestop-gallery.com.


Deadline: Feb. 29: "Art's Alive" (Posted: 1/29/09) -- The Town of Ocean City announces a call to artists for Art's Alive, held June 20 & 21, 2009 at Northside Park in Ocean City, Maryland. Total of $5,000.00 in cash and Ribbons. Media Categories: Ceramics, Drawing, Fiber, Furniture, Glass, Printmaking, Jewelry, Mixed Media, Painting, Photography, Sculpture, Fine Wood. The Art's Alive Jury determines artistic eligibility. The intention of the Art's Alive Fine Art Show is to encourage and support the creation of original art. All work must be original, created and executed by the applicant's own hand, and of professional quality. $25.00 entry fee /$200 space fee. Deadline: February 29, 2009. Visit http://www.ococean.com for more information, or send a SASE to: 200 125th Street & the Bay, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. Questions? Please contact Brenda Moore at bmoore@ococean.com or call 410-250-0125.